The Sun Singer's Travels

Malcolm R. Campbell's World

Archive for the tag “Eulalie and Washerwoman”

Audiobooks for your summer vacation

Let’s face it, no matter how much you like traveling, there will be periods of inactivity when an easy-to-listen-to audiobook might keep you from going nuts (or worse). Expediently, here are for of mine for you consideration:

Eulalie and Washerwoman

AudioFile Magazine: Narrator Tracie Christian’s spirited style is ideal to portray the fantasy world of conjure woman Eulalie Jenkins and her shamanistic cat, Lena, who live in Florida in the 1950s. Christian captures Eulalie’s shock when she learns that Jewish merchant Lane Walker, who’s always traded fairly with the local African-Americans, is being forced to give up his store to the Liberty Improvement Club, which forbids serving blacks. Lively descriptions of Eulalie reading possum bones and casting spells; tender scenes with her old beau, Willie Tate; and feline Lena’s communication with Eulalie via secret thought speech add to the local atmosphere. Listeners will be thrilled when Eulalie transports herself into an alligator to save Walker. S.G.B. © AudioFile 2017

Conjure Woman’s Cat

AudioFile Magazine Red Earphones Award Winner: Wanda J. Dixon’s warmth and gorgeous singing voice are superb in this story about Conjure Woman Eulalie, which is told through the voice of her cat and spirit companion, Lena. Dixon zestfully portrays Eulalie, who is “older than dirt” and is kept busy casting spells, mixing potions, and advising people–that is, when the “sleeping” sign is removed from her door. Most distinctive is Eulalie’s recurring sigh, which conveys her frustration with Florida in the 1950s, when Jim Crow laws and “Colored Only” signs were routine. Dixon’s Lena is fully believable when she spies around town and reports to Eulalie that rednecks have raped and murdered a young women. They almost escape until Eulalie persuades a witness to come forward. Listeners will marvel at the magical realism in this story and benefit from the helpful glossary of the charming local dialect. S.G.B. Winner of AudioFile Earphones Award © AudioFile 2016

Jock Stewart and the Missing Sea of Fire

AudioFile Magazine: Narrator R. Scott Adams’s rapid-fire delivery mirrors the speech of fast-talking old-style newshound Jock Stewart. Listeners need all their skills of concentration, or they’ll miss the story’s wit and even the occasional clue. Sea of Fire is a missing racehorse, but the mystery of his whereabouts sometimes seems merely incidental. The story is high on humor but light on plot–a vehicle for sex, cigarettes, steak, and zinfandel. Stewart, a print journalist, is a likable dinosaur in a changing world. Adams’s timing is perfect, but a second listen is recommended to catch what is missed first time around. C.A.T. © AudioFile 2015

Emily’s Stories

Reader Review: I like it when kids are smarter than adults in stories like this. It gives me hope. The author ‘s writing had a ‘Peter Pan’ feel to it – not that it reads like ‘Peter Pan’ but it’s a kid being powerful and doing something positive. And there is also a magical ‘The Secret Garden’ kind of feel in here.The kid is powerful because she can see & hear the beauty and the magic in Nature. This audiobook has the coldest, scariest ghost voice in the world and also the wonderful open, free and uninhibited voice of ‘Emily’. AND the voices of birds and much more. The widest range of voices I’ve heard from a narrator. And all seemed real, not forced. I believed it – I believed this could happen. M. Stein

Why I wrote ‘Conjure Woman’s Cat’

Because the world around me when I was growing up included this kind of warped nonsense:

Florida Memory Photo

Any questions?

–Malcolm

Conjure Woman’s Cat and its sequel Eulalie and Washerwoman are available at multiple online sites as well as at your book store via their Ingram Catalogue.

Friday is the day to buy this unique Kindle novel

On Sale for 99₵

Eulalie and Washerwoman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DescriptionTorreya, a small 1950s Florida Panhandle town, is losing its men. They disappear on nights with no moon and no witnesses. Foreclosure signs appear in their yards the following day while thugs associated with the Klan take everything of value from inside treasured homes that will soon be torn down. The police won’t investigate, and the church keeps its distance from all social and political discord. Conjure woman Eulalie Jenkins, her shamanistic cat, Lena, and neighbor Willie Tate discover that the new “whites only” policy at the once friendly mercantile and the creation of a plantation-style subdivision are linked to corrupt city fathers, the disappearing men, rigged numbers gambling, and a powerful hoodoo man named Washerwoman.

Review: “Despite the foundation of blatant inequality and disregard for human life this story centers around, Campbell has managed to infuse hope and humor into the reality of life. Authentic dialect spoken by the characters adds an additional layer of reality to the piece, embedding the reader directly into the danger and the action. This is without a doubt a unique and necessary blend of history and magic, delivered through a unique style of storytelling that will not disappoint.” – Elspeth Senz in Book Expo Review, June 2017, Issue #3.

Enjoy the novel!

–Malcolm

Yes, bookstores can order my paperback novels

I’ve added the Thomas-Jacob Publishing logo to my cover photograph because this wonderful traditional publisher has published some of my Kindle books, audiobooks and paperbacks.

What this means is that you can walk into your local bookstore for my books rather than buying on line. If they’re not already on the shelf, the folks there can order my paperbacks from their Ingram catalogue under the same standard bookstore terms and conditions that brought all the other books into their store. Some stores, including one in the town where I live have bookshelves reserved for local authors. We appreciate that.

This includes Sarabande, Conjure Woman’s Cat, and Eulalie and Washerwoman.

Personally, I prefer ordering books from local stores, especially the locally own, independents because that puts money back into the community through salaries, property taxes and business license feels. Beats sending those dollars off to the major online booksellers. And when you buy locally, you don’t have order more books that you really want to get free shipping.

–Malcolm

 

Campbell’s writing stuff – news and reviews

  • Appreciation: Thanks to those of you who picked up a free copy of the new edition of “Carrying Snakes Into Eden” during the recent sale. I hope you enjoy the additional short story added to the book.
  • mountainsongcover4Review: “Eulalie and Washerwoman,” reviewed by Rhett DeVane – “Told through the narrative voice of Lena, Eulalie’s shamanistic cat, the fast-paced story comes alive. The approach is fresh and clever; Malcolm R. Campbell manages Lena’s viewpoint seamlessly, adding interest and a unique perspective.” Tallahassee Writers Association
  • New Title: “Mountain Song” will be released in early March. A companion book to “At Sea,” the novel tells the story of two college students from different parts of the country who meet and fall in love during seasonal employment in Montana’s Glacier National Park.
  • Satire: Florida: It’s Like Living in an Asylum and Loving It – Crazy place to grow up. Perhaps that’s why I keep setting my stories there.
  • Review: “Eulalie and Washerwoman,” reviewed by Julie Summers – “A simply riveting read from beginning to end, ‘Eulalie and Washerwoman’ is very highly recommended for both personal reading lists and community library General Fiction collections.” Midwest Book Review
  • es-portugese-cvr-fQuotation: “There is no real ending. It’s just the place where you stop the story.” – Frank Herbert
  • Newsletter: Keep up with upcoming books, sales and new editions in my publisher’s newsletter. The sign-up form is on the left-hand side of the Thomas-Jacob Publishing news page.
  • Just Released: The Portuguese edition, “Histórias da Emily” of my three-story “Emily’s Stories” about a 14-year-old Florida girl who uses logic and intuition to solve problems is now available Kindle and other online booksellers. (She also talks to ghosts.)

–Malcolm

A note from your sponsor (AKA, me)

  1. The publisher and her editor have the manuscript for Eulalie and Washerwoman, the sequel to Conjure Woman’s Cat. It came out 10,000 words longer than the first book, but that’s okay. Meanwhile, I’ve been talking to the artist about cover ideas. With a little luck, the novel will be available before Thanksgiving.
  2. I really enjoyed this magical realism novel. I wish I'd known about it when it first came out.

    I really enjoyed this magical realism novel. I wish I’d known about it when it first came out.

    A writer friend of mine who hasn’t written anything for a while is writing again. Best news I’ve heard lately. I really like her books and feel that my life isn’t quite as sparkly and wonderful when I don’t have a new one to read. She tells me she’s having fun with the novel. That’s a good sign.

  3. When I lived in a close-in Atlanta suburb 25 years ago, I was a member of an eclectic writing group that met at a bluesy cafe that specialized in tasty craft beers. When I moved away from the Atlanta metro area, I lost track of the other members. A few days ago, I discovered that one of them died five years ago. Had I known at the time, it would have been a shock. Finding out after the fact is horrid, I think. Making it worse was the fact that the page on her former employer’s website that had the announcement included a link for more information. The link didn’t work.
  4. If you’re interested in writing magical realism, here are a few ideas in a post on my other blog: Writing magical realism: step-by-step suggestions.
  5. Writing teachers have told us for years, “show, don’t tell.” That’s probably good advice even though most of a novel can’t be showing our it would be so long people would be scared to buy it. Is the best form of storytelling really the painting of a word picture? This author suggests that it may not be: IS “SHOW DON’T TELL” A UNIVERSAL TRUTH OR A COLONIAL RELIC?
  6. redphoenixSomehow, I’ve gotten hooked into the Dark Heavens series of novels by Kylie Chan. As usual, I’m late discovering these since I’m cheap and seldom read books in hard cover. They’re set in Hong Kong, a place I enjoyed visiting when I was in the navy, and feature Chinese gods, martial arts, a lot of humor, and intrigue. I’m currently reading Red Phoenix.
  7. Looking at the news, it appears that the Chinese space station is going to fall to Earth late next year. I’m not taking any precautions because I believe that if one’s number isn’t up, everything will be fine. If you have other beliefs, you might want to see if the basement of your house is stable because it’s going to fall somewhere. One of my Facebook friends suggests that there’s a novel in that story, but that’s not my kind of stuff. I might read it if one of you writes it! Also, I’m superstitious. That means the darned thing will fall on my house if I started writing about it.
  8. Surprisingly, the winner of the Kindle Fire Tablet from my publisher’s newsletter subscription drive never claimed her prize. If she doesn’t, you have another shot at at it.
  9. If you haven’t visited my website, here’s the link. Yes, I know, I should update it more often, but you know how it is.

Malcolm

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