The Sun Singer's Travels

Malcolm R. Campbell's World

How do you pace yourself when writing?

Is playing am online game a way to avoid work or a way to enhance work?

Is playing am online game a way to avoid work or a way to enhance work?

Sometimes I think the idea of pacing oneself while writing is just an excuse to keep checking e-mail, Facebook, Pinterest, and the latest online games.

Then, there are other times when I think that after writing a scene or a chapter and coming to a natural break in the action, that my brain needs to re-charge before starting the next scene or chapter.

What do you think? Can you write all morning long without pacing yourself? I can’t. But a lot of people count their day’s (or a writing session’s) success by word counts. So much per day or so much per morning.

I find that when a scene or chapter ends, it’s often difficult to change gears and begin writing the next part of the story even if I get determined and keep staring at the computer screen. Yet–if the story is compelling–I find that while, say, playing a game of Words with Friends or updating my blog, ideas for the next part of the story start flowing into my thoughts.

It’s almost as though doing something else causes the floodgates of my imagination to open and here come events, conversations and ideas. Perhaps this happens because, for want of a better phrase, I’m an intuitive writer. That means that I don’t outline or plot out a story. I let it happen. Letting it happen means topping my writing session and doing something else.

That’s when I “hear” and “see” what’s supposed to happen next.

Maybe it works because I think that’s how I ought to do it and I’m comfortable with it. But I wonder, how do other writers keep going–if that’s what they do–or recharge from time to time–if that’s what they do–while working on a short story or a novel.

Do you alternate your writing with creative non-writing or do you forge ahead?

–Malcolm

 Malcolm R. Campbell is the author of “Emily’s Stories.”

Advertisements

Single Post Navigation

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: